RALEIGH AND WAKE COUNTY FIREFIGHTING BY MICHAEL J. LEGEROS

ISBN 0738515124
Retail price $19.99 - 128 pages - Softcover
Approximately 235 black-and-white photographs
Published 2003. Reprinted 2004, 2008

The Images of America Series by Arcadia Publishing
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Chapter 3 - Apex to Zebulon: The Rest of Wake

Knightdale, February 7, 1940. Awakened by cries of her year-old son Zachary, Mrs. Davis Taylor smelled smoke coming from the direction of Robertson Brother's General Store. She roused the rest of her family. including her teenage brother, son of one of the proprietors. At about 2:40 a.m., he and his brother Wiley Robertson Jr. found the rear of the store fully involved...

Wendell Fire Truck, 1954. Located beside the Fourth Street water tower, the fire station housed this 1952 Ford pumper. Shown with the truck, from left to right, is Dover W. Hinton, Clifton "Red" Couick, and W. Crawford Coley. The Ford replaced a Seagrave pumper purchased from Virginia Beach, Virginia in 1941. (Courtesy of Buddy Scarboro.)

Emergency Power Unit, c. 1962. Complementing the Garner Fire Department's large fleet of pumpers and tankers was this 1952 GMC panel van equipped with a generator for powering floodlights and smoke fans. The unit is pictured at 110 Pearl Street, where the fire station was located until 1970. (Courtesy of Garner Fire Department.)

Mill Outlet Village Fabric Store, January 6, 1979. This portable "drop tank" supplied seven fire departments at a Saturday afternoon fire on U.S. 1 south of Wake Forest. (Courtesy of Buddy Scarboro.)

Bay Leaf, 1983. Pictured from left to right are the following: Bobby Johnson (in truck); (back row) Bob Lassiter, and Arthur Gene Lowery; (front row) Chief Hal Atkinson, Frank Ragsdale, and Bill Brown. (Courtesy of Bay Leaf Fire Department.)

Special Delivery, November 2000. Raleigh-Durham International Airport received two of these Oshkosh TI-1500 crash trucks. Each four-wheel drive unit was equipped with a 1500- GPM pump, 1500 gallons of water, 210 gallons of foam, and 450 pounds of dry chemical. They joined an Oshkosh TI-3000 delivered in July. (Peter Brock photograph.)

...and many more!