Charlotte in Yellow

This is a version of an earlier Facebook posting. Here’s view of a vintage Charlotte Seagrave 70th Anniversary Series pumper in yellow, along with other not-red units of the time. The 1966 model, nicknamed “the Chiquita Banana”, was one of two that were bought as a pair. Recounts retired Charlotte Battalion Chief Kenneth Shane Nantz, they …

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One Truck, Two Trucks, Yellow Trucks & More – Solving a Mystery at the Airport

June 29, 2021 And, finally, here are new old photos showing both CB3000 crash trucks at the CFR station at the same time. Proof positive of what’s explained below. Sid Meier photos, scanned from film prints. Sid Meier photos May 11, 2016 Let’s solve a mystery. Did the airport fire department have one or two …

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Raleigh Unit Renumbering Recap

This is a blog version of prior-posted Facebook content. Earlier this year, the Raleigh Fire Department renumbered it’s ladder companies, along with Rescue 1, the haz-mat units, the mini-pumpers, and selected other units.  Round One Old New Date Loc Apparatus  Notes Ladder 1 Ladder 4 01/25/21 Sta 4 2014 Pierce platform   Ladder 2 Ladder …

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Factory Photo of Warrenton’s Ford/Bean Pumper

This content was first posted on Facebook. Warrenton history. Factory photo of 1964? Ford/Bean, 750/500. Reg # B6706. Called a John Bean HPV Fire Fighter, and equipped with high-pressure capability. Delivered with two high-pressure fog guns, two 1 1/2-inch pre-connected lines, three 2 1/2-inch outlets, and 1,200-foot capacity hose bed. Cost around $18,000. Lettered as …

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Knightdale’s New Ladder

Factory photo of Knightdale’s new and sharp-looking ladder. 2021 Pierce Enforcer Ascendant, 1500/500/107-foot. Third for the town[1], following a 1973 Ford/Pierce Telesqurt acquired in 2002, and a 1997 Pierce Quantum rear-mount added in 2009. Photo source.  [1] Two other aerials served the Knightdale Volunteer FD, back in its day, a 1991 E-One rear-mount 75-foot quint, …

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Northern Wake Tanker Overturns / History of Overturned Apparatus in Wake County

Northern Wake Tanker Overturns On Monday night, October 19, 2020, at about 9:20 p.m., Northern Wake Tanker 38 overturned in 6100 block of Ebenezer Church Road, while responding to a house fire on Dewees Court, about two miles south. Two firefighters were aboard, and were transported to the hospital with minor injuries. The 2013 International/KME, …

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Guliford College Fire Department History

This blog post is based on a Facebook posting from May 2020, the content of which was moved here.  Early years 1941, July – Guilford College community members hold meeting about getting fire protection. They plan to petition the county for funds to buy a fire truck. 1945, Aug – County commissioners approve a fire …

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Ca-Vel Fire Departments of Stanly and Person Counties

This content was originally posted in August 2018 on the original blog site. It’s been moved here and expanded with additional content. September 10, 2020 Here’s a new old photo of the Ca-Vel fire department in Roxboro, from an undated picture posted by Mike Warren to the Facebook group Reminiscing in Roxboro, in this thread. …

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Forsyth County Fire Department History

Let’s start a timeline, shall we? Posting to be updated as we go along… Created  FCFD created in 1951. Effort led by Forsyth County Commissioner Wally Dunham, in response to a growing need for fire protection outside the city limits of Winston-Salem. There were just a handful of volunteer departments operating at the time: Kernersville, …

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