Two Alarms on Wallingford Drive

Two alarms were struck this morning at 5051 Wallingford Drive. Dispatched 5:07 a.m. Engine 19 arriving at a two-story, garden-style apartment building with 10,356 square feet and eight units. Built 1985. Heavy smoke showing from the front of the structure.

Transitional attack to start, then interior operations plus exterior blitz monitors for exposures. Second alarm requested after fire started involving the attic and roof. Crews were withdrawn, and aerial operations started with Ladder 2. Fire was knocked down, and crews reentered building to extinguish.

Controlled 5:58 a.m. Sixteen people were displaced. No injuries. Three pets rescued, with one dog found later found deceased. Cause determined as accidental. Firefighters remained on the scene into the morning. 

First alarm: E19, E15, E27, E11, L2, L5, R1, B1, B2; Working Fire: A2, C20, C402; Second alarm: E22, E28, E9, L1, L9, B2; Plus C3. Medical: EMS 7, 64, 1, 15, 5, 64, D1, T1. “B” platoon. 

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Every Last Ladder Truck… Again

Let’s update that posting and montage from February 2014, showing every last ladder truck operated by the Raleigh Fire Department. 

How many do you recognize? Here’s your cheat sheet. As for the montage, it’s a low-res quickie. With a pair of catalog images included, as a change. Don’t believe either is Raleigh’s.

And one truck is out of chronological sequence. See if you can spot it. 

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Vintage Photo of Raleigh’s Old Tiller

Here’s a vintage picture that I don’t believe we’ve shared before. Truck 1 at Station 2 at Memorial Auditorium. That’s the original tiller with its new cab, a 1939 ALF cab towing a 1916 ALF trailer. Two-section, crank-operated, wooden aerial ladder.

Aerial Ladder Truck 1 was originally cross-staffed with the service ladder truck, a 1922 ALF. Both were housed at the original Station 1 on West Morgan Street.

When that station closed in 1941, the ladder trucks were moved to Station 2 at Memorial Auditorium, because they couldn’t fit into the new temporary Station 1, at old Station 2 on South Salisbury Street. Follow?

Engine 2 was then displaced to the new temporary Station 1 and, in fact, Mr. Blogger theorizes, thus began the tradition of having two engines at Station 1. Thinking that the double engines “got good” to the chiefs, and they continued the concept.

When Station 6 opened on Fairview Road in 1949–the permanent one, not the original rented building opened in 1943 and closed in 1948–the service ladder truck was moved there. Engine 2 was moved back to Memorial. And the ladder stayed there until the current Station 1 opened on South Dawson Street in 1953. Got it? Good, there will be a quiz.

Side note, the Engine 2 movement is still partially speculated. Haven’t found supporting docs, like original log books. Just based on photos and inferences.

As for the photo, it’s courtesy Charles Watson. His father is one of the Masons in the picture, Elwin Watson from Kenly, NC.

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Raleigh Fire Department Newsletter – Fall 2018

What’s been happening lately with your fire department? See the latest issue of the Raleigh Fire Department newsletter.

Old-school, old-style reporting. Eight pages about facilities, incidents, apparatus, personnel, et al.

Contents of this issue includes new Rescue 1, three alarms at Glenwood Towers, new Station 12 opening, Recruiting for 2019 and Beyond, and more. 

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Glenwood Towers – Major Fires and Fatal Fires

While we’re still reflecting on the Glenwood Towers high-rise fire from last week, let’s look at the historical perspective. What other major fires–and fatal fires–have happened since it opened in 1971?

Fatal Fires

Feb. 2, 2003
Philip George Moultrie, 55
Fifth-floor apartment. Victim found on living room floor. Pronounced dead on the scene. Apparently started by smoking. Dispatched 2:28 p.m. Fire confined to victim’s apartment.

Jan 4, 1975
William Henry Dunn, 76
Found in his sixth floor apartment. Victim awoke during the blaze and notified a neighbor, who called the fire department. Victim was transported to Wake Memorial Hospital with first- and second-degree burns on both legs, and was listed in fair condition the following day. Two others were transported, one suffering from pneumonia as a precaution, and one for a prearranged trip. Dunn died April 14. Coroner cited arteriosclerosis as cause, with lower leg amputation as other significant condition, from third-degree burns. Nearly all of the 350 residents had evacuated when firefighters arrived. Fire heavily damaged victim’s room but did not spread. Minor smoke damage to sixth floor hallway.

June 6, 1974
Nellie Gray Chappell, 63
Ninth-floor apartment. Victim found in bathroom, deceased on arrival, while small fire burned in nearby clothes hamper. Corner determined cause as “possible malnutrition” and “apparently natural.” Started by light bulb resting against clothing. Fire reported at 12:44 a.m. by two neighbors who noticed smoke in the hall. They called both the fire department and the maintenance foreman. Two policemen arrived, forced the door open, and extinguished the small fire with an extinguisher. Damage $500. Glenwood Towers was built in 1970, and notable for its use of fireproof materials. Neither smoke nor heat detectors were required at the time of construction. Only last week, the Raleigh House Authority had met with salesmen to discuss installing smoke-sensing devices.

Source: Legeros research on fatal fires.

Major Fires

Defined as two or more alarms.

October 26, 2018

Three alarms. Dispatched 12:55 p.m. as fire alarm. Heavy smoke on ninth floor, heavy fire found in single apartment. Working fire at 1:02 p.m. Second alarm at 1:03 p.m. Third alarm at 1:12 p.m. Two additional engines at 1:20 p.m. Additional alarms and personnel for manpower needs, for evacuation and rescue of some 10 to 12 occupants, some that called 911 to report their locations. Water on fire at 1:38 p.m. Extended operations for overhaul, air monitoring, and assisting residents with returning. Six residents transported, one treated and not transported. Over 100 evacuated. Total 28 units damaged, 26 [?] residents displaced.

Fire response: E1, E2, E3, E5, E6, E8, E10 (relief), E11, E13, E17, E20, Sq 7, Sq 14, L1 (relief), L3, L4, L7, L8, R1, C20, C401, C402, C1, C2, C3, C4, C14, B2, B3, B5 A1, A2 (relief), Training Division Chief, Training Captains, recruit academy members.

EMS response: EMS15, 16, 22, 3, 33, 4, 52, 54, 6, 62, 63, 68, 7, 8, plus [single?] units from Franklin, Johnson, Harnett, Granville counties; District 1, 3, 4, 5, Medic 91, 92, 93, 95, CH 101, 102, 200, Evac 1, EMS PIO.

See earlier blog post for more information.

May 18, 1992

Two alarms. Dispatched about 4:45 p.m. Heavy smoke and minor fire in apartment on second-floor. Code 2 on arrival by E5, upgraded to Code 3 by Car 52. Fire in a/c unit, damage only to a/c unit and carpet. E5, E3, T1, R7, C52; E1, E3, T8, R6, C1, C2, C4, C5, C12, SR 5.

Source: Legeros timeline, 1990s.

December 27, 1990

Two alarms. Code 3 on arrival. Heating/air-condition unit on fire in one apartment. Evacuated seventh floor. One resident transported. Second alarm not utilized. E5, E13, T1, C52, R7; E1, E3, T8, C51; C3, C4, C10, C1, C70, SR1.

Source: Legeros timeline, 1990s.

Others?

Are there more two-alarm fires, than recorded here? That’s quite possible. And are there single-alarm responses that should be categorized as “major fire”? That involved heavy fire in a single unit, or heavy smoke and significant evacuation? Good question. Will ponder. 

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Two Alarms on Brook Knoll Place

On Sunday, October 28, two alarms were struck on Brook Knoll Place, in a townhouse complex around the corner from Falls of Neuse and Wake Forest Roads. Dispatched 6:43 a.m. Upgraded to working fire and second alarm, while units were en route, based on number of callers.

Engine 15 arrived at a three-story townhouse with 1,780 square-feet. One of eight units, built 2004. Heavy fire showing in front and rear of structure, on two of the three floors.

Crews initially performed an interior attack, including a courtyard lay in the rear of the structure, with a two-inch line from Engine 9. The fire building was soon evacuated, and exterior operations were started, using Engine 15 deluge gun, Ladder 1 from northwest corner of complex, and Ladder 2 in front of the fire building.

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Exterior hand line was also deployed from behind the fire building, from a second-story balcony opposite the fire building. Crews climbed onto the balcony using a roof ladder. The main body of the fire was knocked down in about ten minutes. The fire was controlled at 7:30 a.m.

Ladder 2 continued to flow into the building, while Ladder 1 was demobilized, along with the second-alarm companies. Engine 15, 19, 9, Ladder 2, and Battalion 5 remained on scene, and “C” platoon personnel were relieved by “A” platoon members. They remained on scene into the morning.

First alarm: E15, E19, E11, E9, L2, L1, R1, B1, B5; Working fire: A2, C20, C402, B2; Second alarm: E16, E4, E22, L5, L3; Plus C2, C3, C4.

Two residents were injured, and transported to the hospital. One later died, a 71 year-old woman. Six people were displaced. 

See more photos by Mike Legeros.

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Airport Orders Pierce Pumper

News from Raleigh-Durham International Airport. They’ve ordered a Freightliner/Pierce pumper to replace CFR 1, a 2005 Ford F-550/4 Guys mini-pumper, 500/250/20. And it’s the first full-size pumper in the airport’s history.[1]

Specs for the unit are:

  • Pierce Responder Pumper 
  • Freightliner Chassis, two-person cab
  • Similar look to DFW Airport FD EZ-29
  • 1250 GPM pump
  • 750 gallon water tank
  • 45 gallon foam tank
  • 500 GPM bumper turret
  • Considered ARFF response vehicle, meets FAA index response requirements. 
  • Though doesn’t into the parking garage(s), is capable of supporting structural fire suppression systems.
  • Approved for purchase in July 2018, tentative delivery is fourth quarter 2019.

[1]  Since 1991, the airport’s used mini-pumpers to supplement their crash trucks. And, before that, skid-mount dry-chemical systems on smaller trucks. Dive into some history.

Board Minutes – July 29, 2018

From the minutes of the Raleigh-Durham International Airport Authority:

Consideration of the Purchase of a Pierce Freightliner Responder Pumper Truck

Upon a motion by Teer and second by Zucchino, the Committee recommends the purchase of one new Pierce Freightliner Responder Pumper truck for $339,429, utilizing cooperative purchasing and authorization for the President and CEO to execute any documents necessary for the purchase.

Presented by Duane Legan, Vice President Airport Operations – Staff requests approval to procure a Pierce Freightliner Responder Pumper truck to replace the current CFR-1 vehicle. Staff requests approval to make the purchase through the Houston-Galveston Area Council (H-GAC) cooperative purchasing program, which provides competitive pricing for fire service response vehicles and is utilized as a preferred procurement mode for the majority of state and local fire departments in North Carolina. While this truck purchase is in the FY 18/19 capital budget, the final pricing for the vehicle is $339,429, which is an overall overage of $4,429 from the budgeted amount; however, funds are available to cover this $4,429 shortfall due to savings on other budgeted vehicles and equipment. Staff requests approval to purchase one new Pierce Freightliner Responder Pumper truck for $339,429, utilizing cooperative purchasing and authorization for the President and CEO to execute any documents necessary for the purchase.

 

Screengrab 

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Three Alarms at Glenwood Towers

Three alarms were struck at Glenwood Towers on Friday. 

More to come. Watch for frequent updates. 

Last updated November 3, 2018

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Contents

  • Historical Perspective
  • Summary
  • Details

Historical Perspective

See this subsequent blog post about major fires and fatal fires at Glenwood Towers. 

Summary

Three alarms. Dispatched 12:55 p.m. as fire alarm. Heavy smoke on ninth floor, heavy fire found in single apartment. Working fire at 1:02 p.m. Second alarm at 1:03 p.m. Third alarm at 1:12 p.m. Two additional engines at 1:20 p.m. Additional alarms and personnel for manpower needs, for evacuation and rescue of some 10 to 12 occupants, some that called 911 to report their locations. Water on fire at 1:38 p.m. Extended operations for overhaul, air monitoring, and assisting residents with returning. Six residents transported, one treated and not transported. Over 100 evacuated. Total 28 units damaged, 26 [?] residents displaced.

Fire response: E1, E2, E3, E5, E6, E8, E10 (relief), E11, E13, E17, E20, Sq 7, Sq 14, L1 (relief), L3, L4, L7, L8, R1, C20, C401, C402, C1, C2, C3, C4, C14, B2, B3, B5 A1, A2 (relief), Training Division Chief, Training Captains, recruit academy members.

EMS response: EMS15, 16, 22, 3, 33, 4, 52, 54, 6, 62, 63, 68, 7, 8, plus [single?] units from Franklin, Johnson, Harnett, Granville counties; District 1, 3, 4, 5, Medic 91, 92, 93, 95, CH 101, 102, 200, Evac 1, EMS PIO.

Details

General

  • Some 10-12 residents rescued from fire floor and floor above. 
  • Six residents transported to hospitals. One treated on scene, refused transport.
  • One news report said over 100 residents were evaluated by EMS. This is incorrect. Early into the incident, officials said that 100+ residents still needed to be evaluated. This was said, because they didn’t have a good handle on many more more still required medical evaluation, to determine further complaints. However, no new patients presented from that group.
  • Eighth floor residents and above were evacuated. 
  • By 4:40 p.m., most residents were allowed to return (source: WRAL).
  • Red Cross opened emergency shelter at church in Garner on Friday night (source: WRAL).
  • Building has 287 apartments, only 10 were vacant. Total 28 units damaged in blaze (source: WRAL).
  • Built 1971. Total 117,584 square-feet. Fourteen stories. Residents are low-income elderly. Operated by Raleigh Housing Authority. 
  • No sprinkler system. 

Milestones

12:55 Call received. Smoke detector activation.   
12:56 Dispatched as automatic fire alarm. E13, L4.   
13:01 Engine 13 arrives, nothing showing, upon entry residents are reporting smoke on upper floor(s).  
13:01 Ladder 4 arrives, reports flames showing from ninth-floor window on north side of tower.   
13:02 Working fire. E1, E5, E6, L2, R1, B3, B2, B5, C20, C402, A1,   
13:03 (?) EMS dispatch: EMS54, 15, D1  
13:03 Second alarm. E2, Sq7, E11, L7, L8.   
13:04 (?) EMS dispatch: EMS 63, 68, M92, CH200  
13:04   Sq7 en route.
13:05   C20 arrives.
13:06   E5 arrives.
13:07   E1 arrives.
13:07 Engine 13 is attack group.  
13:08   E6 arrives.
13:08 Car 20 takes command.  
13:09 (?) EMS dispatch: CH101, 102, M91  
13:09   B5 arrives.
13:10 Heavy smoke on ninth floor.  
13:10   L2 arrives.
13:10   C2 en route.
13:11   E11 arrives.
13:11   E2 arrives.
13:11   R1 arrives.
13:12 First (?) caller to 911 reporting inside apartment, needs help evacuating. Several additional calls received over next hour, including second-party calls from family members contacted by residents.   
13:12 Third alarm: E8, E20, Sq14, L3
Requested after dispatcher relates first (?) report of trapped resident(s).
 
13:14   B2 arrives.
13:14   L8 arrives.
13:14   B3 arrives.
13:16   L7 arrives
13:16 (?) EMS dispatch: EVAC 1  
13:17   C4 arrives.
13:17   C14 arrives.
13:18   A1 arrives.
13:18 Battalion 3 is Fire Operations on Floor 8.  
13:20 Two additional engines dispatched, E3, E17.   
13:23   E8 arrives.
13:23   E20 arrives.
13:24   Sq14 arrives.
13:24   E17 arrives.
13:25   L3 arrives.
13:26   E3 arrives.
13:28   C401 arrives.
13:28   C402 arrives.
13:31 (?) EMS dispatch: EMS 8, 3, 4, D5, M95  
13:34 Fire located, single room with contents, Apartment 927.  
13:38 Water on fire.  
13:42 (?) EMS dispatch: EMS 16, 22, 52, 33  
13:45 (?) EMS dispatch: Special call for out of county,units from Franklin, Granville, Harnett, Johnson county  
13:48 Fire under control. Primary search completed. Secondary search started.   

Later

  • 16:4_ – E10 – Special call.
  • 16:43 – L1 – Special call.
  • 20:33 – Last unit(s) clear scene.

Locations – Outside

  • E13 on SE corner, connected to south standpipe, connected hydrant at Glenwood and Tucker, NW corner.
  • E1 on N side, Johnson Street, connected to north standpipe, connected to hydrant in 500 block Glenwood, mid-block, S side.
  • L4, E6, E5 on Johnson Street, 600 block
  • L2 on NW corner, Johnson and Boylan.
  • Sq7, Sq14, E17, R1, L3 on Glenwood, 500 block.
  • L8, L7, E11, E20 on Tucker Street, 500 block.
  • E3, E2, E8, A1 on Tucker Street, 600 block
  • EMS staging 600 block Glenwood, 400 block Tucker, corner Tucker and Boylan.
  • EMS officers, front parking lot

Locations – Inside

  • Lobby – Command post
  • Floor 9 – Fire
  • Floor 8 – Hose line connection, Div 9, Div 10-14 command
  • Floor 7 – Equipment staging
  • Floor 6 – Rehab

Run Card

  • Fire
    • E1, E2, E3, E5, E6, E8, E10 (r), E11, E13, E17, E20
    • Sq 7, Sq 14
    • L1 (r), L3, L4, L7, L8
    • R1
    • C20, C401, C402, C1, C2, C3, C4, C14
    • B2, B3, B5
    • A1, A2 (r)
    • Training: Division Chief, Captains, recruits
    • Relief companies (r)
  • EMS
    • EMS15, 16, 22, 3, 33, 4, 52, 54, 6, 62, 63, 68, 7, 8, FC, JC, HC
    • District 1, 3, 4, 5
    • Medic 91, 92, 93, 95
    • CH 101, 102, 200
    • Evac 1
    • PIO

Coverage:

  • E17 to RFD 1
  • E28 to RFD 1
  • L9 to RFD 1, then RFD 20
  • Garner L1 to RFD 2
  • Morrisville L1 to RFD 8
  • New Hope engine to RFD 11
  • Rolesville ladder to RFD 28
  • Swift Creek engine at RFD 20
  • Wake Forest E5 to RFD 19
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Raleigh Company and Unit Moves, Effective October 27

Be advised. Effective today, October 27, the following city fire companies and units were moved:

  • Ladder 2 from Sta 11 to Sta 15,  riding the city’s fourth tiller, in service today
  • Ladder 9 from Sta 29 to Sta 23 
  • Battalion 4 from Sta 23 to Sta 18
  • Haz-Mat 2 from Sta 27 to Sta 29
  • Haz-Mat 5 from Sta 18 to Sta 27

Personnel were also shifted, for those crews that cross-staff the haz-mat units: Engine 18 personnel to Sta 27, Engine 27 personnel to Sta 29, and Engine 23 personnel to Sta 18.

Additional moves are pending, to accommodate the renovation of Station 11 on Glen Eden Drive and the relocation of Station 22 on Durant Road:

  • Engine 11 to Station 7
  • Engine 22 to temporary station at water plant on Falls of Neuse Road
  • Ladder 5 and Haz-Mat 4 from Sta 22 to Sta 25.

Will update my web pages and map(s) posthaste.

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Relocating Cary Station 9 – Groundbreaking Ceremony

The Town of Cary on Tuesday held a groundbreaking ceremony for the relocation of Fire Station 9. The 2.53 acre site is located at 1427 Walnut Street, and will replace a smaller facility built in 1974.

Station 9 currently occupies old Station 2, which relocated in 2015 to a new station on Chatham Street. Engine 9 was activated on December 18, 2015. Read blog post.

The new Station 9 is located 1.4 miles to the south and east, and closer to the interstate and commercial properties on the southwest side of town. 

Construction of the $7.9M facility is expected to be completed in winter 2020. 

Project History

  • 2013, October 10 – Property purchased by town of Cary. Site had church buildings on the property.
  • 2015, December 18 – Engine 2, Rescue 2 relocate to new quarters.
  • 2015, December 18 – Engine 9 placed in service at old Station 2.
  • 2016, Fall – Planning and design started.
  • 2017, August – Buildings demolished on site. 
  • 2017, September 12 – Community meeting at Station 2 about project.
  • 2018, October 23 – Groundbreaking ceremony.

Video of Rendering

Filmed at the September 12, 2017 ,community meeting at Station 2.

More Information

Visit the project site, which includes a project history, renderings and a site plan, and the planned project schedule.

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